Storage Tips

To help you get the most from your shares, here is a brief guide on how to prep and store your produce. We follow good sanitation and food handling practices at the farm but please wash your produce before eating. It is best to wash shortly before using your produce. To achieve the longest shelf life it is best not to wash too far in advance.

The storage times below are estimates. We think our produce will last longer than this, as we harvest it as close to the time you will be receiving it as possible. BUT we decided to err on the conservative side.

BEANS and PEAS
Store fresh, unwashed beans or peas in a perforated, or loose, plastic bag in the refrigerator. They should keep for around 5 days.

BEETS
Remove tops (see “GREENS” for keeping the beet greens). Rinse or brush off the beets and store loosely wrapped in a plastic bag. They should stay in good condition in the produce storage bin for 3-4weeks.

BROCCOLI
Keep unwashed, trimming off any large leaves. Store loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. It should keep for 5 days.

CARROTS
Remove tops if they are still present, and store loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. We usually wash our carrots at the farm.

SWEET CORN
Corn should be used within a few days of picking. It is best kept cool and dry. Ideally, refrigerate and eat within 3 days. If your corn has been in the fridge for longer, cut it off the cob and make something creative.

CUCUMBERS
Store in a plastic bag in the produce drawer of the refrigerator. They should last for several days.

EGGPLANT
Keep loosely wrapped in a plastic bag in the refrigerator, but avoid the coldest spot in your fridge! It should keep for 3-5 days.

GREENS
(Kale, Collards, Spinach, Beet Tops, Swiss Chard) Do not store greens in paper bags! Store unwashed with a dampened paper towel in a plastic bag in the produce drawer of your refrigerator. By changing the towel occasionally and keeping it damp, you’ll be able to store the greens for a week or so.

HERBS
Keep basil and rosemary on the counter in a glass jar, with the ends in water. Do not refrigerate basil—it will turn black. Parsley and cilantro can be wrapped in a damp paper towel and kept in the produce drawer, or loosely wrapped in a plastic bag. Both freeze beautifully—just chop and place in a ziplock baggie, or process with a little bit of water and freeze in ice cube trays.

LETTUCE
Do not store lettuce in paper bags! Store unwashed lettuce with a dampened paper towel in a loose plastic bag in the refrigerator. By changing the towel occasionally and keeping it damp, you’ll be able to store the lettuce for up to a week.

ONIONS
Put them in a mesh bag and hang (out of direct sunlight) in a well ventilated, cool, dry place—ideally between 40-50 degrees.

To store chives and scallions, put them in a plastic bag in the refrigerator where they will hold 3-4 days before becoming limp.

PEPPERS
Whole, unwashed peppers will keep in the refrigerator for 3-5 days. Also, you can place small, whole peppers in plastic bags in the freezer (texture will be soft upon thawing). Or, roast a bunch on the grill, when cool, place in plastic bags and freeze. Green peppers may be diced, spread out in a single layer on a cookie sheet and placed in the freezer. Once frozen, place in freezer bags—handy for cooking!

SUMMER SQUASH
Refrigerate in a loosely wrapped plastic bag. They should be good for about a week.

TOMATOES
Do not refrigerate tomatoes unless necessary! Temperatures below 55 prevent ripening and will rob your tomatoes of all flavor. Extras can be frozen whole in plastic bags—these are great for sauce, as the skins will just slip off once thawed. Roast or grill excess tomatoes and freeze for later use.

TOMATILLOS
Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. They can last 3-4 weeks. Their “wrappers” may be looking a little rough at this point, but the flesh should be fine.  Roast or grill excess and freeze for later use.

WINTER SQUASH
Store in a dry, well ventilated pace in the 50-55 degree range. Lower temperatures can cause chilling injuries. Too much moisture may cause it to rot.