Revisiting the Flavors of Summer

A frequent theme we hear during the summer is, “I love all this produce, but I don’t have time to cook it all!”

We feel your pain. This is one of the great ironies of being a farmer–you are surrounded by all this gorgeous, fresh, organic produce…and we have no time to cook it. I used to try to can my leftovers, but frankly, it was too much work. I still made some pickled carrots, okra and turnips this year, but that was about it. FREEZING produce is much more my style.

Many types of produce can be frozen with little or no prep. Some may need to be par-boiled or peeled first, but most things can just be slipped into a ziploc bag and be stored until you need it. Like now.

eggplant burthaI have been using my frozen green peppers (remember when we got TONS of those this summer?) in chili and gumbo. Over the weekend I found a bag of grilled eggplant I had tucked away. I had made baba ganoush with the last batch I found, so wanted to do something different. I found a recipe that we gave out to members this summer: Eggplant Burtha, from my friend Sujata. It is absolutely delicious!

Eggplant Burtha
Two large Italian eggplants
2 Tsp. cooking oil
1 tsp. cumin seeds
1/2 red onion, finely chopped
One green chili, finely chopped
One clove of garlic minced
Two vine ripened tomatoes, chopped (I cheated and used 1/2 a can of diced tomatoes)
One tsp. ginger, finely chopped
1/2 tsp. turmeric
1 tsp. chili pepper
1 1/2 tsp. coriander powder
1 tsp. salt
Finely chopped cilantro (plus a little extra for garnish)

Roast whole eggplants in the oven or on an outdoor grill. Let cool, then remove the skin. Mash with a potato masher.

Heat the oil in a medium size frying pan. Add cumin seeds. Once they are brown, add green chili and onions. Fry onions to golden brown (keep stirring so they don’t burn). Add garlic and tomato and fry for few more minutes to reduce the juices.

Add all other dry spices and fry for 2–3 minutes. Once the juices from the tomato have reduced, add mashed eggplant, salt and cilantro. Add minced ginger and cook everything for about five minutes on low heat or until all liquid has reduced. Garnish with extra cilantro.  Serve with steamed rice, roti, or naan.

What else is in that freezer?

Yesterday I unearthed a bag of frozen peaches. You may remember that our peaches were a little funny looking this summer–some were on the small side, some were freckled and weird looking. These were some of the sweetest most delicious peaches I have ever had though, and I didn’t want any to go to waste! My daughter has been enjoying them in smoothies all winter, but I wanted to try something else. So yesterday morning we had peach scones. What a treat on this brutally cold winter day!

chopped peaches

Work share member Meghan must have been thinking of warmer days as well. I saw a post from her on Facebook that she found a bag of frozen garlic scape pesto leftover from June. She and her family enjoyed garlic scape pesto pizza using pre-made naan from Wegman’s. How easy is that? garlic scape naan

I guess the lesson I am trying to impart today is, even if you don’t have the time or the interest to deal with your produce during its peak, try to set aside 10-15 minutes and save it. Not for a rainy day, but a miserably cold one like today–you will be very happy you did!

More Lettuce?

Nancy B

Nancy Butterhead, the most delicious butter crisp lettuce you will encounter.

Lily and lettuceSometimes Mother Nature does not work on our schedule. What we planned to be a leisurely harvest of lettuce over the course of the Spring season, has turned into a full-on race to get it all harvested before it rots in the field. This condensed schedule was brought on by close to 8 inches of rain in the past two weeks, which caused two things: the lettuce to grow extremely quickly and for its shelf life to be reduced somewhat due to the rapid growth. So yes, more lettuce in your shares, yay! Not to brag or anything, BUT, it is absolutely gorgeous lettuce, and varieties you won’t find in anywhere else. For instance, our favorite variety this year is Nancy Butterhead. For one, we just love saying the name, but it also is one of the best, most delicate and flavorful varieties we have come across in a long time. You will never find this in a grocery store because it is just too delicate to ship.

lettuce 2

Delicious, crisp, lovely, lettuce!

So, besides making a salad, what can you do with lettuce? You can add it to a sandwich, for an extra bit of flavor and crunch. Or, why not try a refreshing chilled lettuce soup? Lettuce cups or wraps are showing up on menus everywhere lately, from P.F. Chang’s to Chez Panisse. Basically, take any “filling” you like, such as egg or chicken salad, or spicy Thai chicken or pork, and wrap it in a lettuce leaf—voila! no fork required—just roll it up and eat like a burrito!

Below are some of the recipes we have been handing out on share days, plus online links to few fun spots. Huffington Post has a new weekly column, highlighting the more unusual things you might find in your share box. Last week they featured kohlrabi, and this week it is garlic scapes. Two very timely, and underrated, vegetables.

Joy and Kate

Joy and Kate harvesting pea tendrils in the early morning.