Thanksgiving. Part 2.

After Thanksgiving...

After Thanksgiving…

Does your fridge look like this? (Ignore the Eggnog; it’s my husbands and it’s inexplicable). If it doesn’t, that means you either had a really relaxing or really disappointing Thanksgiving. Mine was neither…it was a lot of prep, a lot of cooking, and a lot of clean up. It was also A LOT of really great food. My Thanksgiving share set me up for a stellar meal. And for a Tetris game of leftovers in my fridge. So today I offer you some helpful, delicious, and creative ways to use your Thanksgiving leftovers, because another plate of Thursday fare gets old by Friday night.

Breakfast

I honestly eat just as many if not more vegetables at breakfast than I do at the other meals of the day. Hashes, omelets, frittatas, etc., are regular fare over here. So Thanksgiving leftovers are a gift for the breakfast hungry people like me.

  • make a “nest” of mashed potatoes (mine featured caramelized onions and roasted garlic) on a cookie sheet, place a happy hen egg in the hole, and bake until you egg is your desired firmness. Sprinkle some great salt or fresh herbs.
  • sauté your leftover green salad (mine was kale, beets, carrots, and edamame) until hot and tender and then top with a sunny side up happy hen egg (with some sausage on the side if you’re feeling crazy like I was).
  • add your Brussels sprouts or green beans or other veggie side to your omelet.
  • add grated apples to your sweet potatoes and fry as “pancakes.”

breakfast

Lunch

  • add turkey and veggies to spinach or kale for a salad
  • paninis with turkey, cranberry sauce (or Vollmecke’s pumpkin butter!), cheese, and greens

Dinner

  • Turkey pot pie with carrots, bok choy in place of celery, and of course turkey.
  • Shepherd’s pie with leftover mashed potatoes or sweet potatoes on top.

These are obviously throw together, dump what you have in your fridge type of meals, but this is the joy of so many leftovers. All the cooking we did on Wednesday and Thursday is deducted from the cooking we have to do this week!

I am so thankful for Karen and my Vollmecke CSA for all they did to make my Thanksgiving, my year, and my life so full of good food and good feelings. I hope your weekend was great and we’ll be back here soon talking about Vollmecke and winter: an unexpectedly perfect pair!

Changing Seasons, Changing Produce

dewey leafThe days are bright and sunny, and the nights are getting cooler. So far so good—this is Fall, just the way we like it. These are perfect growing conditions for all of the greens we have in the ground right now, and hopefully they are helping to ripen our apples as well!

We have spent quite a bit of time this season talking about what hasn’t grown well, so today I am going to point out a few things that did grow well. But I think you may already know what they are, as you have continued to get them in your shares all summer.

  • Swiss Chard. Nothing seems to stop it. If you don’t like it, now is the time to try, as it shows no signs of slowing down.
  • Tomatillos. Since this was sort of a poor year for tomatoes, I thought these wouldn’t do well, but I was wrong. Salsa Verde was last month; time to try them in a stew.
  • Potatoes. Other than the occasional nut sedge root infiltrating the tubers (see photo below), these just keep going and going…

…which, depending on your point of view, may or may not be a good thing. It is entirely possible that you are up to your eyeballs in potatoes. But just think of all the lovely, organic spuds you could have this winter if you start storing them. I know potatoes are readily available all year, but do you know how commercial growers harvest potatoes? While the vines are still green, they apply a broad range herbicide to kill the plant down to the roots, which makes them easier to harvest. Once the plants are dead and gone, they dig up the spuds and everything around them, which all gets transported to a factory somewhere to get sorted; first by machines, then by actual humans. At some point, they make it to the store.  Sounds tasty doesn’t it?

So how do we do it? We wait for the plants to die back naturally, then Farmer Karen drives the tractor down the row, digging a trench behind her. We, or Chester County Food Bank volunteers, follow along and pick the taters up out of the soil, put them gently into harvest baskets and bring them inside to store in a cool dark spot until we give them to you.

Which brings me to, How To Store Potatoes. They should not be refrigerated! Ideally, they should be kept in the dark, with minimal humidity and cool temperatures. I keep mine in a closed paper bag in the basement. If exposed to light, they will turn green and sprout. Or rot. But properly stored, they will last for months.

Recipes

sedge tater

If you see a little brown hole in your potato, chances are, it was left by a nut sedge root, not a varmint.